Ekwefi and ezinma relationship counseling

Things fall apart Resources

Abstract: Ekwefi's character is one of the most significant characters in things fall apart by Chinua Achebe. Ezinma was the tenth of them who was the purpose of her life. Not only she is She developed a relation like friends between them. right advice about food for feast and her judgment of gun was also not wrong. The relationship between Ekwefi and Ezinma is not a typical parent-child relationship; it is more like one between equals. Ekwefi receives a great deal of comfort. relationship of okonkwo with ezinma. love for her. concern is shown in the way he shouts at Ekwefi, when Ezinma fell sick and Okonkwo was supervising Ekwefi when she .. Sidewalk Counseling Manual (Abortion Clinic Protest Instructions).

Prove your position with a good example. Discuss the role of women in founding and maintaining a family in Igbo society. Explain the custom of the bride-price. The concept of ogbanje is foreign to Western readers. Okonkwo shows a softer, more loving side in his relationship with Ezinma. Explain the judicial function of the egwugwu and the relationship of the egwugwu to the living. Note the relationship of the egwugwu to Igbo women.

How do you know that Okonkwo is one of the egwugwu? What qualifications does Okonkwo have to enter the secret society? Explain how the story of Tortoise and the birds fits in with some of the other stories Achebe has told about animals throughout the novel.

Explain the purpose of these stories. Explain why all the characters, Okonkwo, Ekwefi, Ezinma, and Chielo, were powerless to alter the events of this dark night. Describe the role of women in Igbo society based on the information you have gathered in this chapter.

Things Fall Apart: Character Relationships andTheir Ro by Keiara Newsome on Prezi

Discuss the role of women in the family, women in religion, and women in politics. Explain how Achebe complicates the character of Okonkwo. Compare Okonkwo on the dark night he waited for Ezinma at the cave of Agbala with Okonkwo on the day he accompanied his adopted son, Ikemefuna, through the forest. Explain why Ezeudu is such an important and well-respected man in Umuofia. Discuss his family, his finances, his political power, and his role in the community.

Obierika is a thoughtful, well-balanced Igbo. Part Two Chapter 14 1. Uchendu attempts to convince Okonkwo that he is not the greatest sufferer in the world.

Provide three examples Uchendu uses to make his point. Give a detailed example explaining how Obierika is a good and loyal friend to Okonkwo. Why does Uchendu tell the story of Mother Kite? Give three reasons to support your points. An efulefu is a man who sells his machete and wears only his sheath into battle.

Is the efulefu a good representation of the Igbo men and women who were first attracted to Christianity? Provide at least three examples to support your point. Explain how Christianity exacerbates the relationship between Nwoye and Okonkwo. Provide two quotes to support your points.

He wonders how a man like himself could father a weak and useless son like Nwoye. Describe the osu and explain why the young church is upset about allowing the osu to join the congregation. Some members of the traditional Igbo community want to persecute the Christians; others take a more moderate stand.

Things fall apart Resources

Explain the rationale behind the two different reactions to the Christians. What does the elder mean when he says the young people do not know how to speak with one voice? Explain why the elders are fearful for the younger generation. Provide three examples to support your point. Part Three Chapter 20 1. Identify the role and function of the court messengers and explain the native court system. Use the land dispute between Aneto and Oduche to illustrate how the native court system worked.

Okonkwo plans to return to Umuofia with a flourish. Discuss in detail three reasons why his return is not as exciting as he planned. Explain one basic way in which the Igbo traditional religion is similar to Christianity. For this reason he is not drawn in a flattering light, but his culture is given a full and fair depiction.

  • Things Fall Apart Teacher’s Guide

He would rather play his flute than repay his debts. It follows, then, that land, a full barn, expensive titles, and many wives confer status. Our protagonist is ambitious. Indeed, one of his flaws is his fear of failure, of becoming like his father.

Viewing society from the inside, students can make inferences about why a high value is accorded to clan solidarity, kinship, and hospitality, and the reasons for courtship and funeral customs. In a culture without written language, the arts of conversation and oration are prized. Wisdom is transmitted through proverbs, stories, and myths. The agrarian cycle of seasons, with their work and festivals, the judicious use of snuff and palm wine, the importance of music and dance, all could be noted and compared to similar Western mores.

Law and justice keep the peace, pronouncing on a land dispute or the killing of a clansman. A priestess and masked tribesmen interpret the Oracle, speaking for ancestors and gods. They enforce taboos against twins and suicide, and offer explanations for high infant mortality.

The second and third parts of the novel trace the inexorable advance of Europeans. The first white man to arrive in a nearby village is killed because of an omen, and in retribution all are slaughtered by British guns. Christian missionaries seem to be madmen, their message of wicked ways and false gods attractive only to outcasts. But along with Christianity come hospitals and schools, converting farmers to court clerks and teachers. Trading stores pay high prices for palm oil. Government is closely linked to religion and literacy.

Okonkwo, upholder of the ways of his ancestors, is inevitably cast in the role of tragic hero. In exile during the first years of colonization, he has less understanding of the power of the Europeans than his now-passive kinsmen. His doom is swift and sure. This guide uses the contemporary spelling, Igbo, rather than Ibo. It provides us with a powerful fable about the immemorial conflict between the individual society.

These twin dramas are perfectly harmonized and they are modulated by an awareness capable of encompassing the life of nature, history, and the mysterious compulsions of the soul. Things Fall Apart is the most illuminating and permanent monument we have to the modern African experience as seen from within. The novel is structured in three parts. What do the divisions reflect about the stages of life of the protagonist? How do the divisions move toward and illustrate the collapse of Igbo society?

What is the point of view of the narrator? How does the point of view contribute to our understanding of the conflicting cultures? What techniques does the narrator use to evoke a participatory role for the reader? How does this contrast with the ending, when Okonkwo is deliberating about an adequate response to the British humiliation of the Igbo elders in jail?

Achebe uses storytelling flashbacks to describe the relationship of Okonkwo and Unoka. What do the flashbacks reveal about their relationship?

What is the effect of the use of storytelling to illustrate the flashbacks?

Things Fall Apart - Wikipedia

In Chapter One, how does Achebe foreshadow the presence and ultimate fate of Ikemefuna? Describe the judicial function of the egwugwu and its relationship to the living, particularly to Igbo women. Why is it also related to the spiritual world? How does Achebe illustrate the blending of the spiritual and real worlds? How does the killing of Ikemefuna foreshadow the fall of Okonkwo? Why is Okonkwo exiled? Why is the exile ironic?

When and how is the white man introduced? What attitudes toward the Igbo people do the white men bring and how do their attitudes determine their treatment of the Igbo people?

How does Achebe use incidents to paint the general character of the white colonizers? Character and Conflict 1. How does Okonkwo achieve greatness as defined by his culture? Why is Unoka, who suffers from a swelling in the stomach, left to die in the evil forest? How does Okonkwo differ from his father? What are his feelings toward his father? Cite examples in the attitude and actions of Okonkwo that show the Igbo division of what is considered manly and what is considered womanly. Why is Okonkwo unhappy with his son and heir?

How do his feelings toward Nwoye compare with his feelings toward Ikemefuna? Why is Ikemefuna killed? How does Nwoye react to the sacrifice? Okonkwo changes significantly after the killing of Ikemefuna. Why does Nwoye convert to Christianity? How does his conversion affect his relationship with his father? How is his portrayal different from the Igbo characters? Compare and contrast him with other white colonists.

How do his actions show disdain for Igbo traditions? Setting and Society 1. The novel begins in Umuofia and ends in Umuofia. What surprises you about life in an African tribal community? What preconceptions did you bring to your reading that were either reinforced or changed? Why do the community celebrations make Okonkwo unhappy? Igbo culture is patriarchal. What is the role of women in the community? Does their role make them less valuable than men? How does wife beating reflect the community attitude toward women?

Near the beginning of the novel, we learn that Okonkwo has several wives. What does this arrangement reveal about family life in the community? Describe the Igbo extended family system. How does it help Okonkwo to survive his exile in Mbanta?

Compare and contrast Umuofia and Mbanta. How do their similarities and differences add to an understanding of the Igbo culture?