Things fall apart okonkwo and ekwefi relationship tips

The character of Ekwefi in Things Fall Apart from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

Chinua Achebe's novel ''Things Fall Apart'' follows Okonkwo, an Igbo man, start of their relationship, she suffers a great deal under Okonkwo's sudden mood. 8 | Page. Ekwefi's Role in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe She possess the qualities which distinguish her of Okonkwo's other wives. relationship of trust. right advice about food for feast and her judgment of gun was also not wrong. Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart () is commonly read as a testimony of the guide. Indeed, we learn a great deal about Igbo society: its history, wars, religion, And appropriately, her relationships with Ekwefi, Chielo, and Okonkwo .

Discuss the role of women in founding and maintaining a family in Igbo society. Explain the custom of the bride-price. The concept of ogbanje is foreign to Western readers. Okonkwo shows a softer, more loving side in his relationship with Ezinma. Explain the judicial function of the egwugwu and the relationship of the egwugwu to the living. Note the relationship of the egwugwu to Igbo women. How do you know that Okonkwo is one of the egwugwu? What qualifications does Okonkwo have to enter the secret society?

Explain how the story of Tortoise and the birds fits in with some of the other stories Achebe has told about animals throughout the novel. Explain the purpose of these stories. Explain why all the characters, Okonkwo, Ekwefi, Ezinma, and Chielo, were powerless to alter the events of this dark night. Describe the role of women in Igbo society based on the information you have gathered in this chapter.

Chinua Achebe's 'Things Fall Apart' reading - BBC Newsnight

Discuss the role of women in the family, women in religion, and women in politics. Explain how Achebe complicates the character of Okonkwo.

Compare Okonkwo on the dark night he waited for Ezinma at the cave of Agbala with Okonkwo on the day he accompanied his adopted son, Ikemefuna, through the forest.

Explain why Ezeudu is such an important and well-respected man in Umuofia.

things fall apart okonkwo and ekwefi relationship tips

Discuss his family, his finances, his political power, and his role in the community. Obierika is a thoughtful, well-balanced Igbo. Part Two Chapter 14 1. Uchendu attempts to convince Okonkwo that he is not the greatest sufferer in the world.

Provide three examples Uchendu uses to make his point. Give a detailed example explaining how Obierika is a good and loyal friend to Okonkwo.

Why does Uchendu tell the story of Mother Kite? Give three reasons to support your points. An efulefu is a man who sells his machete and wears only his sheath into battle.

Is the efulefu a good representation of the Igbo men and women who were first attracted to Christianity? Provide at least three examples to support your point. Explain how Christianity exacerbates the relationship between Nwoye and Okonkwo. Provide two quotes to support your points. He wonders how a man like himself could father a weak and useless son like Nwoye. Describe the osu and explain why the young church is upset about allowing the osu to join the congregation.

Some members of the traditional Igbo community want to persecute the Christians; others take a more moderate stand. Explain the rationale behind the two different reactions to the Christians. What does the elder mean when he says the young people do not know how to speak with one voice? Explain why the elders are fearful for the younger generation. Provide three examples to support your point.

Part Three Chapter 20 1. Identify the role and function of the court messengers and explain the native court system. Use the land dispute between Aneto and Oduche to illustrate how the native court system worked. Okonkwo plans to return to Umuofia with a flourish. Discuss in detail three reasons why his return is not as exciting as he planned. Explain one basic way in which the Igbo traditional religion is similar to Christianity.

Explain another fundamental way in which the Igbo traditional religion is different from Christianity. Ironically, in all his efforts not to end up like his father, he commits suicide, becoming in his culture an abomination to the Earth and rebuked by the tribe as his father was Unoka died from swelling and was likewise considered an abomination.

Ekwefi is Okonkwo's second wife. Although she falls in love with Okonkwo after seeing him in a wrestling match, she marries another man because Okonkwo is too poor to pay her bride price at that time.

Two years later, she runs away to Okonkwo's compound one night and later marries him. She receives severe beatings from Okonkwo just like his other wives; but unlike them, she is known to talk back to Okonkwo. She is the only one who has the audacity to knock on the door of his obi at dawn. Having met with the grave misfortunes of the deaths of her first nine children, she is a devoted mother to Ezinma, whom she protects and loves dearly.

When Chielo, a priestess of Agbala, the Oracle of the Hills and Caves, says that the oracle wishes to see Ezinma, Ekwefi follows the priestess through the dark woods and even makes up her mind to enter the cave where Agbala resides and to die with her daughter if need be. Okonkwo looks for them and goes to the mouth of the cave himself after waiting for a certain period, because he too was very worried about Ezinma and Ekwefi even though he had kept this worry to himself.

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe - Teacher's Guide - ddttrh.info: Books

Upon finding Ekwefi, he was very relieved and they both waited for Ezinma. Unoka is Okonkwo's father, who lived a life in contrast to typical Igbo masculinity. He loved language and music, the flute in particular. He is lazy and miserly, neglecting to take care of his wives and children and even dies with unpaid debts. Okonkwo spends his life trying not to become a failure like his father Unoka. Nwoye is Okonkwo's son, about whom Okonkwo worries, fearing that he will become like Unoka.

Similar to Unoka, Nwoye does not subscribe to the traditional Igbo view of masculinity being equated to violence; rather, he prefers the stories of his mother. Nwoye connects to Ikemefuna, who presents an alternative to Okonkwo's rigid masculinity.

He is one of the early converts to Christianity and takes on the Christian name Isaac, an act which Okonkwo views as a final betrayal. Ikemefuna is a boy from the Mbaino tribe. His father murders the wife of an Umuofia man, and in the resulting settlement of the matter, Ikemefuma is put into the care of Okonkwo. By the decision of Umuofian authorities, Ikemefuna is ultimately killed, an act which Okonkwo does not prevent, and even participates in, lest he seem feminine and weak.

Ikemefuna became very close to Nwoye, and Okonkwo's decision to participate in Ikemefuna's death takes a toll on Okonkwo's relationship with Nwoye. Ezinma is Okonkwo's favorite daughter, and the only child of his wife Ekwefi.

Ezinma, the Crystal Beauty, is very much the antithesis of a normal woman within the culture and Okonkwo routinely remarks that she would've made a much better boy than a girl, even wishing that she had been born as one. Ezinma often contradicts and challenges her father, which wins his adoration, affection, and respect. She is very similar to her father, and this is made apparent when she matures into a beautiful young woman who refuses to marry during her family's exile, instead choosing to help her father regain his place of respect within society.

Obierika is Okonkwo's best friend from Umuofia. He is a strong and powerful man in Umuofia, but unlike Okonkwo, he is a reasoning man and is much less violent and arrogant. Obierika often talks Okonkwo out of making rash decisions, and helps Okonkwo when he is on exile from Umuofia. He fully understands the changes going on in their society, and that their clan no longer had the unity it did before the white man appeared in Umuofia.

Obierika's son, Maduka, is greatly admired by Okonkwo for his wrestling prowess, which in Okonkwo's opinion is something his own son, Nwoye lacks.

Obierika is considered the voice of reason in the book, and questions certain parts of their culture, such as the necessity to exile Okonkwo after he unintentionally kills a boy. Ogbuefi Ezeudu is one of the elders of Umuofia. He is regarded as very wise, and gives Okonkwo good advice. He is the one who brings Okonkwo the message from the Oracle that Ikemefuna should be killed, but he also warns Okonkwo not to participate in the boy's execution, since Ikemefuna calls Okonkwo "father", a warning Okonkwo does not heed.

At Ezeudu's funeral, Okonkwo's gun misfires, accidentally killing the dead elder's son, for which Okonkwo and his family go into exile. Brown is a white man who comes to Umuofia. Unlike most Europeans portrayed in the novel, he shows kindness and compassion towards the villagers, thereby earning their love and respect. He eventually develops an illness that leads to his death. Background[ edit ] Most of the story takes place in the fictional village of Iguedo, which is in the Umuofia clan.

Umuofia is located west of the actual city of Onitshaon the east bank of the Niger River in Nigeria. The events of the novel unfold in the s. The customs described in the novel mirror those of the actual Onitsha people, who lived near Ogidi, and with whom Achebe was familiar. Within forty years of the arrival of the British, by the time Achebe was born inthe missionaries were well established. He lived in the British culture but he refused to change his Igbo name Chinua to Albert.

Things Fall Apart Teacher’s Guide

Achebe's father was among the first to be converted in Ogidi, around the turn of the century. Achebe himself was an orphan raised by his grandfather. His grandfather, far from opposing Achebe's conversion to Christianity, allowed Achebe's Christian marriage to be celebrated in his compound.

In a interview with The Paris ReviewAchebe said, "the novel form seems to go with the English language. There is a problem with the Igbo language.

It suffers from a very serious inheritance which it received at the beginning of this century from the Anglican mission. They sent out a missionary by the name of Dennis. He was a scholar. He had this notion that the Igbo language—which had very many different dialects—should somehow manufacture a uniform dialect that would be used in writing to avoid all these different dialects.

Because the missionaries were powerful, what they wanted to do they did. This became the law. But the standard version cannot sing. There's nothing you can do with it to make it sing. It doesn't go anywhere.

things fall apart okonkwo and ekwefi relationship tips

While both African and non-African critics agree that Achebe modelled Things Fall Apart on classic European literature, they disagree about whether his novel upholds a Western model, or, in fact, subverts or confronts it. Also, in the logic of colonization and decolonization it is actually a very powerful weapon in the fight to regain what was yours.

English was the language of colonization itself.