Examine the relationship between ethics values and morals

Difference Between Ethics and Values - Key Differences

examine the relationship between ethics values and morals

But they are still relative values. Our relative moral values must be constantly examined to make sure that they are always performing their. What is the relationship between and/or differences of Values, Morals and Ethics ? The differences are slight - but they are real and important. Ethical conduct is very necessary for the long term sustainability of the business. At the same time, values and moral are also very much ddttrh.info there some.

Differences between ethics and laws: However, there are many distinctions between ethics and laws.

Values, Morals and Ethics.

To some extent, ethics is not well defined but laws are defined and precise. Ethics can also be distinguished by looking at whether people are being punished after they violate the rules.

examine the relationship between ethics values and morals

Nobody will be punished when they violate ethics; but whoever violates laws is going to receive punishment carried out by relevant authorities. Besides, an action can be illegal, but morally right. For example, in ancient China, some people rob properties from rich people, and give it to poor people, and it is considered to be morally right but be illegal.

The branch of ethics that deals with psychology, sociology, anthropology, etc. The study of the moral course of action through practical means. This branch tells us how we can achieve moral outcomes, in a particular circumstance.

examine the relationship between ethics values and morals

Definition of Values Values refer to the important and enduring beliefs or principles, based on which an individual makes judgements in life.

They severely affect the emotional state of mind of an individual. Values are forces that cause an individual to behave in a particular manner.

examine the relationship between ethics values and morals

It sets our priorities in life, i. It reflects what is more important for us. So, if we are true to our values and make our choices accordingly, then the way we live to express our core values. This level relates closely to the last, and deals with the responsibility of public officials to ensure their actions serve the public, and that the power they wield is used only for that purpose.

It is easy to abuse the power that comes with public office. Procedural safeguards are designed to prevent that abuse. The moral obligation of public servants is to follow established procedures, and not to use their power to circumvent those procedures for their own convenience or benefit. Power must be used fairly and for the benefit of the public. One can again think of examples of public officials who have violated this moral charge by using their influence and power for their own benefit or for the benefit of special interest groups, or who have circumvented established procedures for their own benefit or convenience.

One frequent example is the use of government vehicles or aircraft for nonofficial business. These first three levels of public morality share one important characteristic: These three levels are the areas that get most of the attention in discussions of ethics, this is where public officials are most likely to get in trouble. However, there are three additional levels of public morality equally important.

Difference Between Morals and Ethics (with Examples and Comparison Chart) - Key Differences

These deal with the content of what public officials do, "the moral choices involved in deciding what to do, in pursuing the purposes of the state and the society" Willbern. Given that public officials are operating within a democratic system, they either are elected by the people or appointed by an elected official. This confers upon them the obligation to carry out the will of the people.

However, public officials also have the responsibility to make moral choices consistent with their own values, and that may be in conflict with what they perceive to be the will of the people. Willbern contends that the public official acts according to his or her own judgment, rationalizing that it would be the will of the people if they were well enough informed on the issue. To give one example of this level of public morality, consider whether or not the representative in Congress is morally bound to support policies and legislation which his constituents overwhelmingly support but he personally opposes.

This level involves the most difficult ethical choices, because it concerns making moral judgments about public policies. The responsibility is to make moral policies; the difficulty is in determining how moral a policy is. Public policies almost always deal with very complex issues, where ethical choices are rarely clear, and it is often difficult to determine if a policy is right or wrong.

For example, many public policies deal with the distribution of limited resources. Is it right or wrong to slash funding for one program, or to increase funding for another? In almost any decision, there will be winners and losers, and there will be some benefit for some and cost to others. Equity and fairness are important considerations, but not always easy to discern.

The determination of how much funding to provide for national security, and which social programs to fund, involves ethical choices of the most difficult type.

Difference Between Ethics and Values

What is the difference between equality and equity? Consider the controversy around affirmative action programs: This final level deals with an area not as salient as some of the others. It deals with the necessity for compromise in a society. A society with irreconcilable differences on fundamental issues will be torn apart.

Hence, it becomes a moral obligation of public officials to engage in give and take, working toward compromise in the policies they develop. One often sees legislators in our political system establishing positions where they may not get all they want from particular legislation, but will settle for some of what they want.

Willbern contends that compromise, rather than standing on principle, is moral, because without compromise there will be discord and conflict, and disintegration rather than integration of the society. Public officials are given the trust of the public to develop and carry out policies that are in the public's best interest. Living up to this trust has a significant impact on the national will; public confidence is essential to the exercise of national power.

Public officials have a moral duty to act in a trustworthy manner. Why, then, do individuals behave unethically? One reason is the complexity of the issues leaders deal with, and the difficulty in many instances of determining which is the most ethical alternative.

Values and Ethics

There are several systemic factors. One is the competition for scarce resources. It is easy to slip into unethical acts to gain a competitive advantage in the race for position or power. A second is conflicting loyalties, which Johns labels "the most troublesome ethical dilemma facing public officials.

Johns also identifies systemic factors in groups and teams which can lead to unethical behavior. One is groupthink, which can occur in a homogeneous group with a strong leader.

A second is the presence of idealogues: