Relationship between matter and energy in ecosystems lesson

Flow of energy and matter through ecosystems (video) | Khan Academy

relationship between matter and energy in ecosystems lesson

Materials, properties of matter, phases (solid, liquid, gases); energy flow, by conducting an experiment that demonstrates the importance of light to plants. Students construct possible food webs for six different ecosystems and learn about If students already have explored gases, this lesson may be used as a review. Ecosystems are a constant flow of matter and energy from one place to another. In this lesson, we will discuss some of the important energy and. It wasn't until that the link between scurvy and vitamin C was made. Without the Unlike energy, matter is recycled in ecosystems. In the.

And why do they consume them? Why does a bunny eat the grass? Well, because it gets energy from those bonds in the biological molecules, from those carbon bonds, and other bonds. And it's able to use that energy to grow itself, to reproduce, to live, to run around, and it also stores some of that energy in its own biomass. And once again, this process is not very efficient.

Well, because not all of the plants get eaten. The whole process of eating plants, digesting plants, some of the energy gets pooped out, gets pooped out because the primary consumer here, or the consumer isn't able to get all of it out of the actual biological molecules. And so overall, it's an inefficient process.

relationship between matter and energy in ecosystems lesson

Now, we're not done yet. We still have energy stored in the biological molecules of this primary consumer that someone might be interested in. And we know that in many ecosystems there are things that like to eat rabbits or even squirrels.

The Flow of Energy in an Ecosystem

And in this drawing it will be this fox. And this fox because it eats primary consumers, we would call it a secondary consumer. And you could keep going on with this if there were some character out here.

relationship between matter and energy in ecosystems lesson

Let's say there's some guy who likes to eat foxes. That's a knife in his hand that he uses to go after the foxes with. Well, so the fox could go to him, and once again, why is he eating foxes? Well, he wants that energy in that fox, and actually it's not just about molecules.

We'll talk about matter in a second. He wants the energy and the matter from the fox to grow and live himself. And so this character would be called a tertiary consumer. And if there's no one who wants to eat him, well then he would be considered an apex consumer, or an apex predator. And these characters that eat other animals, we've talked about it before, they're called carnivores. But let me just say, he's the apex. And apex, we're really thinking about the top of the food chain.

Flow of Matter in Ecosystems ( Read ) | Earth Science | CK Foundation

That's why they're called, that would be called an apex consumer, or an apex predator. But we're not done yet because at some point all of these characters, whether we're talking about the trees, the bunnies, the fox, this character who likes to eat foxes, they're going to die.

And that energy just doesn't disappear. In general, you're going to see, energy is conserved and it flows from one place to another. That energy is then going to be used by these characters right over here, which we call decomposers.

They can take all that leftover energy and that dead carcass or even in the poop, and they can make use of it, once again, for them to live, for them to reproduce. And then by breaking that down, they can release a lot of those nutrients and the matter that's used. And once again, the matter's recycled, once again, to be used by the plants. So it creates this really nice cycle. And the important thing to realize is that it comes in as light that energy gets transferred as we go through the different layers of trophic.

And it's not a completely efficient process, and a lot of that energy, especially as these organisms live, and reproduce, and run around gets released as heat. Now we've focused a lot on the energy, let's think a little about the matter. I've already touched on it, but the matter is recycled.

There isn't, at least the way that we've set this up, there isn't new matter that is entering or leaving these ecosystems or being magically created or magically destroyed. As I mentioned, when you look at a leaf on a plant growing, or a tree growing, or a leave of grass growing, that matter isn't just coming out of nowhere, it's coming out of, it's just a different form, or maybe the best way to put it, that matter was always there in the form of carbon dioxide.

The plant is just using that energy from the Sun to fix that carbon from a gas form into a solid form. And it's able to use that energy to form bonds between the carbons in these biological molecules that actually store energy. And the plant can use that energy to grow and as we've talked about, things that eat the plants, or things that eat the things that eat the plants can use that energy.

Ecosystems | Lesson 3 - Matter Cycles and Energy Flows in Ecosystems | CarbonTIME

And as we talked before, the carbon dioxide comes in these plants. And maybe this arrow might be a little bit misleading, so let me erase that for now. But we release oxygen, O2. That oxygen, and we've seen that as part of the photosynthesis process, that oxygen is used by the animals to metabolize these biological molecules.

We studied that in biology in respiration. In Lesson 3 they explain why that pattern exists by tracing matter and energy and connecting scales: Guiding Question How do carbon atoms and energy move through an ecosystem? Activities in this Lesson Activity 3.

relationship between matter and energy in ecosystems lesson

Carbon Pools 20 min Activity 3. Carbon Dice Game 30 min Activity 3. What Happens to Soil Carbon?

  • BioEd Online
  • Flow of energy and matter through ecosystems

Tracing Energy Through an Ecosystem 30 min Activity 3. Explaining Patterns in Ecosystem 30 min Objectives Describe carbon cycling within ecosystems as movement of carbon atoms among carbon pools associated with: Eating, defecation, death Carbon-transforming processes: Identify energy transformations involved in carbon fluxes Describe energy as flowing through ecosystems, from sunlight to chemical energy to heat that is radiated into space NGSS Performance Expectations Middle School Matter and Energy in Organisms and Ecosystems.

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

relationship between matter and energy in ecosystems lesson

Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems. Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems. Matter and Energy in Organisms and Ecosystems. Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Ecosystems | Lesson 3 - Matter Cycles and Energy Flows in Ecosystems

Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy in and out of organisms. High School Chemical Reactions.

Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction. Use mathematical and or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems and different scales. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems at different scales.

Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.

relationship between matter and energy in ecosystems lesson